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Kill 'em all!

Well, Zimbabwe announces a ban on lion hunting and 1/2 hour later Cecil's brother Jericho was shot dead by a "hunter". Humans are disgusting!

Web Link


Comments

I just read about Jericho (Cecil's brother). I am so sad!


^^^ Humans are disgusting! ^^^

Does the include you?


... that ...


It has been discussed many times that Homo sapiens/better known as humans are the most dangerous roaming our planet.


^^^ It has been discussed many times that Homo sapiens/better known as humans are the most dangerous roaming our planet. ^^^

The poaching of a beloved lion doesn't make humans "disgusting" or "the most dangerous." Most humans are outraged by the act of a trophy hunter and his guides.

What's disgusting is that some allow the ghouls at Planned Barrenhood to harvest and sell fetal tissue. Some even defend it with alacrity.


Some might disagree with the above assessment, although with a slight adjustment to - "What's disgusting is that some have nothing else in their lives but disgust", demonstrating that disgust daily with interference of topic, misdirection, lies and anything else that rational folks would term arrogant attention getting and self-promotional - that would make it much more appropriate.

Some might call that type behavior (above) sick, referring to an individual like that as a drama queen and troll. Civility seems to be an unattainable goal for those very few.

It is indeed sad that both Cecil and now his brother are gone. They were beautiful animals and unless there's another brother out there, the bloodline is gone aside from what's already on the ground; and the young cubs of theirs are now in serious jeopardy.

That's sad; and for what?


fd: bite me for trying to hijack my thread!

Make up your own thread if you want to rave about total hyped BS.


It is a commentary on human nature. We all find pain and sadness at the loss of life of two animals while we dine on the carcasses of slaughtered cows and pigs. We adore our dogs and cars. We give them names and buy them toys. We go so far as to giving our pet kitty or puppy human characteristics. We, however, license the killing of deer, antelope, and other creatures.

To be clear, I too love puppies and kittens (I have two of each), have hunted myself, and am saddened by the death of the two lions.

The thread brought to me the irony of humanity's dichotomy.


Point well taken, Mr Bills - but I would offer that cows, hogs, chickens and the like are market animals which is a very distant cry from these beautiful beasts of the wild.

I don't recall ever choking up while enjoying a good ribeye, yet reading this and knowing what happened to Cecil and now his brother Jericho really does break my heart. These rare and proud creatures are irreplaceable.

Sad indeed.


This guy nails it: Web Link


Take away his false bluster and phony anger, his politicization of a non political event and his obvious hatred, and he is in full agreement with my sentiments.

There are those, however, who support the lion killing on the basis that killing lions produces jobs.

"In reality, most people in Zimbabwe rely on big game hunters like Palmer to drive their economy. There is an 80% unemployment rate in the African nation, so business from a wealthy traveler like him is very much appreciated. The dentist paid $50,000 to hunt the lion."

Web Link


No, he paid $50k to kill the lion... hunting was no where to be found.


The good news is the reports of Jericho's death may have been inaccurate. Web Link

With regards to trophy hunting supporting African economies, many governments think so -- the US dentist had been granted a Zimbabwean government license to kill a lion -- but some nations are now finding they can bolster revenues similarly with licensed photo safaris, which have the advantage that the main attraction is still there for the next customer... and the next.


Whenever a story like this captures the nation I always wonder what we're being distracted from.


"Companion of Cecil the Lion, Jericho, Is Alive", Web Link

This piece appears to confirm Mike's post above and also states that Cecil and Jericho are not related (same bloodline), but were good friends. Jericho has been seen protecting the cubs left behind by Cecil, he's been pictured since the claim of his death and he has an active GPS collar on.

It seems that in all the hype, some have let their emotions turn into confusion. The matter is sorry enough without any additional irresponsible statements on non-fact.

I can't help but wonder how this will all play out for the dentist, Palmer, that took Cecil's life. He's already lost his business, has and continues to receive death threats (which are usually benign, but all it takes is one) and is trying to weave himself between all the opposing factors, entities and people that want revenge. Will he end up standing trial in Africa? Will he be extradited? Would he agree to be tried for a crime he says he didn't commit in a nation on the other side of the world?


^^^ Whenever a story like this captures the nation I always wonder what we're being distracted from. ^^^

The atrocities at Planned Parenthood, for one.

Details of the lousy Iran deal and the secret UN IAEA deals, for another.


People always ask, how can you worry about a little thing like X (for example a single lion) when there are so many more important issues like, for instance, world hunger, abortion or foreign policies. Similarly they ask, how can we spend so much money on space programs when we could put that money toward curing disease instead?

The two have little to do with reality.

First, we will never cure all human hunger and disease in our lifetimes regardless of the money we throw at it. Should we therefore always be shackled by our failings and forever give up glorious and noble explorations? Focus only on the basest of concerns? Not for a second! What a dreary world that would be and a waste of our abilities.

Second, the world is made of individuals, man and beast, all with our own stories. We only know individuals, only bond with individuals. It's only possible to connect with an individual. It's what our world is made of and why our hearts break the hardest for a single being, whether a human or a wayward puppy or Cecil the lion lured to his death. We imagine the fear or pain and can relate to what he or she is going through.

So again, should we limit our caring because there is *always something else* that is supposedly more serious? No. Caring about the small things is normal, it's what our world is made of and it makes us human.

As a human I therefore refuse to feel guilty for caring what happened to Cecil while children are going hungry in his country of Zimbabwe.


Well said, uffish.


Nice try, Franny.


Thanks Mike.


^^^ First, we will never cure all human hunger and disease in our lifetimes regardless of the money we throw at it. ^^^

Fetuses aren't a disease and we don't have to "throw money" to stop trafficking fetal tissue. All we have to do is break the symbiotic link between Planned Parenthood and the Democratic Party. All we need to do is stop giving taxpayer dollars to Planned Parenthood, despite what a smarmy washed up sportscasters say about it.


Troll on, dude; Mike seems happy to provide you with all the attention you need; were it only for good reasons, though.

What an incorrigible child you are, francis. Always with unnecessary, unneeded and unwanted personal attacks; "...a smarmy washed up sportscasters say about it."

And just when we thought God didn't make junk, ...

"All we have to do is ..." And who, prey-tell, is "we"?


>>Fetuses aren't a disease<<

Of course not, I didn't mean to imply that for even a picosecond.

>>All we need to do is stop giving taxpayer dollars to Planned Parenthood...<<

I certainly agree that we need to stop giving conscientious objectors' taxpayer dollars to Planned Parenthood's abortion services.

Let's take this back over to the other thread, if I may suggest...


A completely different perspective:

In Zimbabwe, We Don’t Cry for Lions

Web Link


I certainly agree that we need to stop giving conscientious objectors' taxpayer dollars to Planned Parenthood's abortion services.

No, we don't. You don't get to pick and choose in this society. You don't get to decide you're not going to support shared services. That's exactly the wrong way to run a society. People need to get over the notion that we all have a vote on every single topic and issue. We don't That's not how it works.


The guy is here taking an American PhD position and then gets an attitude toward Americans: "Don't tell us blah blah blah when you're blah blah blah."

Go home then!


Might I suggest that instead of getting your dander up, you actually consume what the gentleman has to say. He is making a point - a very good and valid point, first hand from the experience of growing up right there ... a local perspective.

That this gentleman is doing his best to better himself, and is doing so using our higher learning centers I think is admirable and speaks to his drive and perspective. If anything, I would think it enhances his position. I saw no disrespect in his op-ed; bewilderment, maybe ... but no disrespect.

This speaks to the 'tolerance' we often mention here on TA. It is good to hear opposing positions to our own. That accomplishes two things (primarily); 1) the matter is further and better vetted & 2) we learn, or at least we should.

It all starts with an open mind, open to the ideas of others - which should in turn initiate thought.

Thought is good.

Now we (you, me or anyone else) may or may not view it the same way, but to heckle a man that was born and raised there and has a firm handle on the thoughts and feelings of locals is valuable input, even if it is a completely different perspective.

Tolerance and a thirst for learning and understanding can go a very long way in today's world. The lack of that can cause damage, sometimes severe damage. Heck, we don't have to go any further than local government to see and feel that.


Sorry but like others I've developed an intolerance for those who act rudely or make demands as a guest in host country.


uff, I didn't see either in his op-ed; but that's just my perspective.

I could likely better understand your posture were we talking about an individual from Syria (for example) extolling the virtues of ISIS while attending American University (for example); and we have seen occasions like that. I don't see this as one of them.

Being born and raised in DC, I met quite a few from other countries attending the DC and surrounding area colleges (Georgetown, American, George Mason, etc). Most, by a large margin, were privileged; they were the sons and daughters of diplomats ... and most were a blast to be around.

Most of them went back to their country when they completed their education, taking American values and education with them and introducing that 'advantage' to their country of origin.

Yamani would be one example, but far from the only one. Web Link

Communication is such a wonderful thing. So is tolerance and understanding. Sometimes we have to put our own feelings aside to get a better understanding on a matter, particularly in disagreement.

Hey, you never know; this guy may end up as the US Ambassador to Zimbabwe! (or visa-versa)


I know many many foreign born residents with advanced degrees and most of them are wonderful and grateful to be here. Many have gone on to become US citizens and often become even more pro-American than some of us born here.

However the occasional one decides to use his entrance into our society as a chance to tell us how terrible we are while at the same time enjoying the opportunities and financial assistance we provided. That's what gets my dander up.

Back to the topic....


"...while at the same time enjoying the opportunities and financial assistance we provided." That's an assumption on your part, uff.

For examples of the 'cost of education' at some of this country's better colleges, look no further than Berkeley. Many in-state residents don't make the admissions cut over foreign students, not because of qualifications, but because of fees paid. It is the same at the schools I mentioned and many many more.

But you're right - back to topic.


That would make a great new topic.


Sorry but like others I've developed an intolerance for those who act rudely or make demands as a guest in host country.

Intolerance is a wonderful approach. Tear down those bridges!


Here's when social opprobrium goes way too far:

Vandals attack vacation home of dentist who killed Cecil

Web Link


Intolerance is the correct response to bad behaviour.

As to the vandalism... besides it being wrong, illegal, etc, using parts from one poor dead animal to protest killing a different one is really dumb.


Intolerance is the correct response to bad behaviour.

The writer is providing his perspective, not exhibiting bad behavior, Uff. Come on.


IMO it's rude when you're getting the benefits this country affords them.

BTW, PhD candidates like this person are generally considered research assistants and should be getting a stipend along with their research funded by various taxpayer-supported agencies.


IMO it's rude when you're getting the benefits this country affords them.

Who is "they"? We're all immigrants in this country, every single one of us. That's one of the MANY things that makes this country great.

My folks landed here in 1653 and we're still getting settled.


This is good news-- a "fundamental shift that has taken place in how we, as people, are viewing wildlife.”

Web Link ..... "California Bobcats Will Avoid Cecil’s Fate Thanks to New Baiting Ban"

"Instead of requiring conservationists to show scientifically that hunting the bobcats would be harmful to the species or the environment, they laid the onus on bobcat trappers to show that trapping the species would not be harmful.

“Before we make a decision to allow destruction of a natural resource, we should have the science to support that as a practice,” Commissioner Anthony Williams said during the Wednesday public hearing. “I don’t think that burden has been met.”

"The California hunt in recent years fed increasing demand for the diminutive, 20-pound cat’s fur in China, Russia, and other countries, where one white-bellied bobcat pelt can sell for $200 to $600."


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