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players get the fantasy of virtuoso guitar playing without learning a single note.

"Computers have become tools of distraction", Kay said, "instead of education". He singles out Guitar Hero as the best example of this — players get the fantasy of virtuoso guitar playing without learning a single note.

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LA School District tells Apple to stuff their iPads where the World Wide Web Won't Work:

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There are only four skills when it comes to computers. Turning them on, searching the web, installing hardware, and writing code. Most people don't get past the first two and still know all they will ever need to know about using a computer.

Almost anybody except for the over educated can figure out how to turn them on.

Unless you can think, there is no hope you will find the web useful. If you do know how to think, a half day seminar would get you up to speed on how to use Google effectively.

Like Guitar Hero, there is little a computer can teach you.


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The devices themselves simply deliver a payload of applications, databases and content. It's the content and tools that matter. The devices eventually all become commodities.

Certainly, different hardware architectures deliver those payloads more or less efficiently or conveniently.

But all tech companies understand that those payloads are king.

Almost anybody except for the over educated can figure out how to turn them on.

What does that even mean? How does one become "over" educated unless one wants their circumstances to remain what it is? Or is there a liberal counter to conservatives' "redistribution of wealth" trope for liberals, like you, that believe exceeding the baseline education level of the pack is somehow bad or elitist?

You don't get it, Dan.


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Take heart in knowing that everything we are taught about about computers today will be passe shortly.


Take heart in knowing that everything we are taught about about computers today will be passe shortly.

Please explain your point, Barnus.


If you do not understand the obsolescence inherent in a burgeoning technology, you are beyond hope.


I had the opportunity to take a Cisco Certified Networking class when I was at Half Moon Bay High fifteen years ago. Because technology advances at an exponential rate, the devices we were using then are substantially out of date now.

What I learned, however, remains exceptionally relevant. The core principles remain relevant and are increasingly important as networking - and technology - have become more important in our daily lives.

To suggest that we shouldn't learn technology because new technology will quickly come along misses the point entirely. While I'll happily agree that there is a balancing act involved in determining when to emphasize it and when not to, technology of all sorts is an important part of our world, and the education of our children.


You are entirely right, Justin. I was being flip and should not have been.

Nonetheless, Much - most - of what is now seen as true and is true about he big picture field of computers and related technologies will not be seen as true in he not distant future. That is not to say that learning about what we have is not valuable. All knowledge has value and it is difficult to see in advance what knowledge and what areas of knowledge will prove to be the most valuable in the long run.

Still, we have to set priorities.

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big picture field of computers and related technologies will not be seen as true in he not distant future.

Everything in use today is a derivative of the technical past or a concept out of the sci-fi of the past. Technical training creates a bedrock for further technical pursuits just as reading books creates an expanded vocabulary and an increasing ability to read more complex literature.


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